Wednesday, October 17, 2012
Just when you think the sun’s setting on the Harvest of 2012…
This pretty shot was taken yesterday morning in a winter wheat field, just starting to sprout on Brian Scott's farm in Carroll County, Ind.
Brian told us via Twitter that he’s doing an experiment with 15 of the 78 acres he’s planted. He’s mixed the wheat with radishes, hoping to get a yield bump. It’s the first time he’s done this, he said, and pointed us to a blog post explaining research that shows increases when using radish cover crops.
Our (not so) educated reply: Who knew?!
"I think they are going to be key for future profitability and sustainability," Brian said.
What’s up with your harvest? Click here to share your story and photos!
— Peggy Lowe

Just when you think the sun’s setting on the Harvest of 2012…

This pretty shot was taken yesterday morning in a winter wheat field, just starting to sprout on Brian Scott's farm in Carroll County, Ind.

Brian told us via Twitter that he’s doing an experiment with 15 of the 78 acres he’s planted. He’s mixed the wheat with radishes, hoping to get a yield bump. It’s the first time he’s done this, he said, and pointed us to a blog post explaining research that shows increases when using radish cover crops.

Our (not so) educated reply: Who knew?!

"I think they are going to be key for future profitability and sustainability," Brian said.

What’s up with your harvest? Click here to share your story and photos!

— Peggy Lowe

Thursday, October 11, 2012
The drought is still taking its toll on Rhonda McClure's small sheep farm — she calls it “an island of dry.”
"I’m done with summer," she wrote on her blog, Ewe and Us. “The thin ice on the tank was almost welcome. A friendly fire for the evening and a warm wool blanket for the bed at night still comfort a modern shepherd. But, alas, something is still missing - the gentle patter of rain.”
Still, that didn’t stop her from taking a stroll to see the fall colors the other night, taking us along via photos, viewing as “the leaves hung limply in the still evening air, turning golden like ripening fruit.”
The end of her walk via blog is the picture above of her husband, Don, doing chores that evening.
But if the drought had Rhonda (and us) depressed, please read her post. There are two very sweet signs of hope, in little sprouts now growing in Nebraska.
— Peggy Lowe

The drought is still taking its toll on Rhonda McClure's small sheep farm — she calls it “an island of dry.”

"I’m done with summer," she wrote on her blog, Ewe and Us. “The thin ice on the tank was almost welcome. A friendly fire for the evening and a warm wool blanket for the bed at night still comfort a modern shepherd. But, alas, something is still missing - the gentle patter of rain.”

Still, that didn’t stop her from taking a stroll to see the fall colors the other night, taking us along via photos, viewing as “the leaves hung limply in the still evening air, turning golden like ripening fruit.”

The end of her walk via blog is the picture above of her husband, Don, doing chores that evening.

But if the drought had Rhonda (and us) depressed, please read her post. There are two very sweet signs of hope, in little sprouts now growing in Nebraska.

— Peggy Lowe

Wednesday, October 10, 2012
 A post (or ghost?) of harvest past. 
Lovely silhouette by Judi Graff, who took this last fall in her family’s corn field in central Illinois.  She’s one of the hardest-working farm wives online — whether it’s Facebook, Twitter, or her blog. 
— Peggy Lowe

A post (or ghost?) of harvest past.

Lovely silhouette by Judi Graff, who took this last fall in her family’s corn field in central Illinois. She’s one of the hardest-working farm wives online — whether it’s Facebook, Twitter, or her blog.

— Peggy Lowe


Friday, October 5, 2012

When we hired Abbie Swanson away from WNYC, we had no idea the journalist from New York had a farm background.

We have since learned that she is from a long-established Swedish farm family from Illinois — she wrote “Rediscovering my farm family" for our blog this week.

While the trip brought back memories for Abbie and her dad, she brought us back these great photos. Here’s her description on the top picture:

Wind turbines blink red below a full harvest moon on the Knox County horizon. The turbines would have been a pretty big shocker to my great-great granddad, Swan Swanson, who bought land here in 1890 when he moved to Illinois from Sweden.

As for the pretty pic of the colorful flint corn, Abbie said it was from a Sunday morning trip to Bishop Hill, Ill., to check out "Jordbruksdagarna," a traditional Swedish nineteenth-century harvest festival that features old-school farm demos.

Want to share your harvest photos or travels? Click here to send them to the Harvest Network.

— Peggy Lowe


Thursday, October 4, 2012
Taken just this morning by Nebraska farmer Zach Hunnicutt, I thought this photo portrays so much promise. A new day. A bountiful harvest.
Or maybe it reveals more about the hard work — and waiting — involved at harvest time.
"Just an auger wagon in need of a truck," is how Hunnicutt put it on his Twitter feed.
Hunnicutt lives near Giltner, Neb., and was harvesting corn today. His job description?
"My family and I turn sun, rain, soil, and seed into corn, popcorn, and soybeans in south-central Nebraska."
What’s your job? And how does Harvest 2012 look from your place? Click here to send us your photos!
— Peggy Lowe

Taken just this morning by Nebraska farmer Zach Hunnicutt, I thought this photo portrays so much promise. A new day. A bountiful harvest.

Or maybe it reveals more about the hard work — and waiting — involved at harvest time.

"Just an auger wagon in need of a truck," is how Hunnicutt put it on his Twitter feed.

Hunnicutt lives near Giltner, Neb., and was harvesting corn today. His job description?

"My family and I turn sun, rain, soil, and seed into corn, popcorn, and soybeans in south-central Nebraska."

What’s your job? And how does Harvest 2012 look from your place? Click here to send us your photos!

— Peggy Lowe

Wednesday, October 3, 2012
For some reason, I really liked the Instagram filter Matt Splitter used on this photo. It made me think of the harvest for what it is, one of the oldest practices in the world, done as the light of summer begins to fade.
For Matt, it was much more of a ta-da! moment. He posted this on Twitter:
"2012 Soybean harvest begins in KS!"
Matt, a fifth-generation farmer from Lyons, Kan., can be found here. And, of course, at work on the 2012 Harvest.
— Peggy Lowe

For some reason, I really liked the Instagram filter Matt Splitter used on this photo. It made me think of the harvest for what it is, one of the oldest practices in the world, done as the light of summer begins to fade.

For Matt, it was much more of a ta-da! moment. He posted this on Twitter:

"2012 Soybean harvest begins in KS!"

Matt, a fifth-generation farmer from Lyons, Kan., can be found here. And, of course, at work on the 2012 Harvest.

— Peggy Lowe

Wednesday, September 26, 2012
This is called “field reporting.” Literally.


Savannah, Mo., farmer Curtis Adkins takes a break from harvest to explain to University of Missouri journalism students how he’s set aside some of his cattle and row-crop operation to be Conservation Reserve Program land.
Photo by Abbie F. Swanson, our reporter based in Columbia, Mo.
Want to show us what’s up — or isn’t, given this drought — in your fields? Click here to send us your harvest pics.

This is called “field reporting.” Literally.

Savannah, Mo., farmer Curtis Adkins takes a break from harvest to explain to University of Missouri journalism students how he’s set aside some of his cattle and row-crop operation to be Conservation Reserve Program land.

Photo by Abbie F. Swanson, our reporter based in Columbia, Mo.

Want to show us what’s up — or isn’t, given this drought — in your fields? Click here to send us your harvest pics.

Monday, September 24, 2012
It’s like watching HDTV, only in real-definition, from the buddy seat of the combine.
"They love picking corn no matter how bad #drought12 has hurt it…," says Melissa McClain, of Long Island, Kan.
The stay-at-home mom and farmwife offered this photo of her kids on Twitter. She and her husband, raise registered Texas Longhorn cattle on 3,000 acres of cropland. She blogs here and is on Twitter @prairiesky10.
Interested in sharing your photos of the harvest at your place? Click here!

It’s like watching HDTV, only in real-definition, from the buddy seat of the combine.

"They love picking corn no matter how bad #drought12 has hurt it…," says Melissa McClain, of Long Island, Kan.

The stay-at-home mom and farmwife offered this photo of her kids on Twitter. She and her husband, raise registered Texas Longhorn cattle on 3,000 acres of cropland. She blogs here and is on Twitter @prairiesky10.

Interested in sharing your photos of the harvest at your place? Click here!

Thursday, September 20, 2012
Amy Mayer, our new reporter in Ames, Iowa, is experiencing the Midwest up close and personally. She just moved here from Massachusetts and during her first week, we drug her to the Farm Progress Show outside of Des Moines.
Lately, she’s been spending time with folks working on Harvest 2012. This photo of a gussied-up combine is from a blog post she did about a group called “Farm Rescue,” a volunteer organization that literally rides to the rescue of folks in need. Read her post here.
And yes, she really is “Amy in Ames.” And since she’s on Facebook, that means it’s for real.
What’s your Harvest 2012 look like? Click here to send us your contributions to our fall Tumblr.

Amy Mayer, our new reporter in Ames, Iowa, is experiencing the Midwest up close and personally. She just moved here from Massachusetts and during her first week, we drug her to the Farm Progress Show outside of Des Moines.

Lately, she’s been spending time with folks working on Harvest 2012. This photo of a gussied-up combine is from a blog post she did about a group called “Farm Rescue,” a volunteer organization that literally rides to the rescue of folks in need. Read her post here.

And yes, she really is “Amy in Ames.” And since she’s on Facebook, that means it’s for real.

What’s your Harvest 2012 look like? Click here to send us your contributions to our fall Tumblr.

Monday, September 17, 2012
There’s all kinds of looks in the rear-view mirror. This is a good one.
"In line to dump my last load of #harvest12 #corn. I couldn’t be happier to have it behind us." — Matt Boucher, an Illinois farmer who tweets at @boucherfarms and is online here. 
Matt also reported that the folks at his farm finished harvesting on Saturday night.
"It was a record breaking corn harvest for us. New record on how fast it was over and new record on low yields," he said. 
What’s going on for you? Click here to share your harvest pics with us!

There’s all kinds of looks in the rear-view mirror. This is a good one.

"In line to dump my last load of #harvest12 #corn. I couldn’t be happier to have it behind us." — Matt Boucher, an Illinois farmer who tweets at @boucherfarms and is online here.

Matt also reported that the folks at his farm finished harvesting on Saturday night.

"It was a record breaking corn harvest for us. New record on how fast it was over and new record on low yields," he said.

What’s going on for you? Click here to share your harvest pics with us!